Ginger-Garlic Paste – Perfect for Indian Cooking!

If you’re like me and you cook a ton of Indian food (or even if you’re looking to get into it!), you probably find yourself going through ginger and garlic at a prodigious rate. Fact is, a healthy dollop of each is all but essential at the start of almost every North Indian dish out there, and mincing or grinding them fresh every time can be. . . let’s be polite and call it “trying.”

Luckily, ginger and garlic lend themselves to long-term storage in the form of ginger-garlic paste, and it’s an absolute breeze to make for yourself, so long as you’ve got a few basic ingredients and tools! For the visual learners in the audience, check out this album!

Ginger-Garlic Paste
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Ginger-Garlic Paste
Yum
Print Recipe
Tangy, bold, and pungent, this blend of ginger and garlic (with a little oil and salt) can camp out in the fridge for a couple of weeks without issue and can be spooned into Indian, Chinese, or Thai dishes as needed.
Servings Prep Time
12 dishes 15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 dishes 15 minutes
Ginger-Garlic Paste
Yum
Print Recipe
Tangy, bold, and pungent, this blend of ginger and garlic (with a little oil and salt) can camp out in the fridge for a couple of weeks without issue and can be spooned into Indian, Chinese, or Thai dishes as needed.
Servings Prep Time
12 dishes 15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 dishes 15 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: dishes
Instructions
  1. Combine a roughly equal amount of peeled, smashed garlic and peeled, roughly chopped ginger in the work bowl of a small food processor or very powerful blender (a wet-dry grinder works great, too, if you have one!).
  2. Pour in the salt and enough oil to get the mixture moving and start to process/blend it, stopping to scraping down the sides every 30-60 seconds, until you achieve a smooth, yellowish paste.
  3. Store in an airtight container (actually airtight; this stuff is pretty fragrant!) for up to 3 weeks in the fridge, or use an ice cube tray to freeze 1.5 tablespoon-sized portions, then store in a Ziplock bag in the freezer up to six months. You. . . might not want to use that tray for regular water ice afterward, though.
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